The relative value of D&D novels

On my visit to the local library yesterday, I learned something about the relative value of various D&D novels. After checking out my books, as is my habit, I took a look at the books they have for sale. I noticed about a dozen paperback Ravenloft novels in mint condition for a dollar each. In the hardback section, they had a few Dragonlance novels for two dollars each, also in mint condition. And out in the lobby where they have books for free, there were maybe 18 paperbacks and two hardbacks of Forgotten Realms novels on offer. Those realms have really been forgotten because these books also looked brand new.

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Wow! I’ve enjoyed most of the FR books I’ve read. I’d buy that for a dollar!

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It because all us nerds…I mean Gaming Connoisseurs have to buy them for our collections. No one thinks of reading one of the fine and outstanding books then having to return said book. How would you sleep at night.

I was guilty of this back in the day…always buying the latest release thinking I had to have it for my collection. Now I often will check out a series at the library and if I enjoy the first one, I may buy it and others. If I don’t I’ve saved myself some dough, some shelf space, and left it for someone else to enjoy as they may.

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I Audible most things these days. The convenience of audio books is way to easy.

I Audible most things these days. The convenience of audio books is way to easy.

It is, but I love the act of reading. I think it’s all about personal choice there. My audio time is full of more podcasts than I can keep up with (as I’m listening to a cast while I’m typing this) but I personally enjoy the act of reading. Super excited audio books are an option as well.

I agree with you about actually reading versus listening to audio books. I find I can’t really focus enough on fiction audio books. I invariably tune out and miss something while I’m listening. With nonfiction/podcasts that doesn’t matter as much. I’m also doing other things when listening to audio (e.g., doing the dishes). Reading means you get lost in the book and your entire focus is on the book, not on multitasking.

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Yeah, @NOLAbert, that’s me too. Now, that said, if people love the audio book format, again, I’m happy for them, it just doesn’t work me.

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Interestingly enough, I have a buddy who says he is the opposite. What I mean is he can focus on the fiction of audiobooks while driving—he’s sort of a captive audience. But while reading the page, he’s recursive, or he thinks about other things, or he puts down the book and goes after something else. I don’t drive enough to have tried fiction in audiobook enough times to know how I like it, but enough short drives to whittle away at podcasts.

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There is a definite time to listen to books or podcasts just like only certain times to read the written word. I also love the act of reading, but with the way my time allocation happens to be, I’d be lucky to get though a golden book let alone much of a novel. I totally agree about so many good podcasts and other stuff to listen too.

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I concede to the point of audio books and driving. I walk to work, so I don’t spend much time in my car, and therefore can’t speak to that.

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