344 Streaming and Recording RPG's

Being recorded around Memorial Day 2021, we’ll be talking about streaming or recording your rpg. This may be something you do as a game master or even partaking in a game that is being streamed or recorded, we’ll have some tips and advice as things may be just a touch different than playing in your house with nobody watching/listening.

https://gamingandbs.com/344

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I’ve ran about 50 sessions online, most available on youtoobz

One thing I like to do is I can screen share location pictures, large scale maps and npc portraits (usually famous people in sepia) to give fuel to the theatre of the mind, condiments to shared meal you might say.

Most of my games have been with The Gauntlet, where rule questions are generally typed into chat so verbal is mostly in-character. Everybody mutes themselves unless they are talking to remove excess audio clutter. Spotlight is shifted often to keep people engaged, and bio-breaks every 60-90 minutes is standard.

I am massively in favor of recording games and I shall tell you why - during the 90s i played and ran hundreds of games, like 2-4 a week. Some of them were great fun, some of them were a goddamned trainwreck, but they are really starting to blur thanks to the distance of time.

But with youtube etc, you can go back and watch the stories you created, learn from the lessons, and laugh at the bizzare situations that evolved. Even stuff that happened 2 years ago I can rewatch and go wow i’d forgotten that, that game was a cracker!

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Greetings all. I had a few thoughts on streaming and recording. I’ve been recording with Skype of Cthulhu for five or six years. With over 700 episodes and 10 years, it’s one of the granddaddies. It started, I’ve heard, as a means of playing. The recording and publishing is mostly gravy for us, but does have some affects on the game. I think it pushes us to show up every week, which is great. We also are more likely to fill silences and to read handouts out loud. That said, I would say this is one of the most “actual” actual plays out there. Unedited and with very little concession to the existence of an audience. We prefer to have people play even if they have a crappy mic and a weak internet connection. This brings me to one of my main thoughts about actual plays. I find a big range between an actual actual play and whatever critical role is. No knocks about either—depending on my mood and goal for listening, I enjoy both.
SoC is really a recording of game sessions with, as I said, very little concession to the listening public. No sound effects, no editing, no listener interaction etc. We try to stop recording at the end before talking dirt about the scenarios or engaging in out-of-game banter, and in fact one thing recording does do for us is keep us slightly more focused on the game than we otherwise might be.
Many of my favorite “actual” plays, on the other hand, are highly produced, and those that are streamed live often also have some level of audience interaction and even participation. These things make for a very different thing—more of a play than a game (although always some of both).
I have recorded a some games “for the record”—and even used an automated transcription service on the recording so it would be searchable. It was great after a PC made a brash promise to a fey creature to have it on record in all its literal trouble. It’s also good for playtests. This seems different from publishing though, since there’s no external audience.
I think I had some other thoughts while listening to the episode, but it was hot and my brain melted.
Happy gaming y’all!
Edwin

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I listened to podcasts waaaay back in mid-2000s. I remember the horrible audio of Geekspeak and Dragon’s Lair, among others. Later, but still early gamer podcasting greats like Godzilla Gaming, Durham 3, Sons of Kryos, and Have Games Will Travel didn’t always have amazing audio quality either. Back then I was so hungry for the content that the quality of the audio wasn’t a huge issue for me.

Mostly, I’m still that way. I can deal with a weak mic or p-puffs more than I can a million “like” or “ummm” fillers or lip smacking. I guess I still am totally fine with guerrilla podcasting. BUT, there is less excuse for it today. Advice on how to achieve solid audio quality can be had with a minimal of searching or simply by contacting someone who has a level of quality you want to emulate. The tech is relatively cheap, and really solid sound can be achieved with a smart phone in a closet full of sound-absorbing clothes. Bad sound these days is one of two things - an insult to the listener because the podcaster just doesn’t care OR a kind of punk podcasting manifesto because the podcaster doesn’t think ANYONE should care about form over content. I kind of respect that, but I also acknowledge that some people have far more discerning ears than I do.

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You both made some good points about how streaming can affect your game. My favorite saying along these lines is that role-playing games are like skinny dipping: strip down and get in or go away - looky-lookies not welcome. It’s a big step to turn your game into a broadcasted event and everyone at the table had better be on board. Fundamentally, you are doing two things now, playing an RPG and engaging in entertaining others. The latter can end up trumping the other and will certainly transform the way you play.

BTW, I listened rather than watched. Was Brett drinking out of a big ass plastic or glass jug? I can’t believe Sean didn’t yell at him. :smiley:

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Maybe I was…

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I started listening to Androids and Aliens produced by The Glass Cannon Network. I am very early in the show (episode 3 of 136) but It is an AP that actually captures my attention. The thing I like is short episodes, minimal downtime, and the players still control their characters. In some other APs the GM dictates too much how people act, feel, etc. These guys also are not doing a food order in the middle of the show completely killing the momentum (this happened in another AP I tried for Masks).

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